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The New HPV vaccine: More Power against Cancer

 

 

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What is HPV?
 

There are over a hundred known strains of the Human Papillomavirus, with 40 of them able to cause illness in humans. HPV strains 6 and 11 are known to cause genital warts, whereas strains 16 and 18 are strongly linked to rectal and genital cancers.

There is currently no medication or treatment for HPV infection, but vaccines do exist for us to effectively guard against contracting HPV in the first place. There are currently two of these vaccines available in Thailand:
  • The 2-valent HPV vaccine (protects against strains 16 and 18)
  • The 4-valent HPV vaccine (protects against strains 6, 11, 16 and 18)

The good news is that in November 2020, a new HPV vaccine that protects against nine strains of virus has become available in Thailand, increasing the level of protection as never seen before.  

 

 


What is the Human Papillomavirus 9-valent Vaccine?
 

Developed from its 4-valent predecessor, the HPV 9-valent vaccine is prepared from virus-like particles. It protects against strains 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, for both males and females between 9 and 45 years of age.


 

 

What can this vaccine protect against?
 

The 9-valent HPV vaccine can protect both males and females against the following:

 
Females aged 9-45 years Males aged 9-45 years
  • Cervical cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, rectal cancer, oral cancer, and throat cancer (From HPV strains 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58).
  • Precancerous lesions of cervical cancer, vulvar cancer, vaginal cancer, and rectal cancer (from HPV strains 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58).
  • Genital warts (from HPV strains 6 and 11).
  • Rectal cancer, oral cancer, and throat cancer (from HPV strains16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58).
  • Precancerous lesions of rectal cancer (from HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52 and 58).
  • Genital warts (from HPV strains 6 and 11).
 

 



Who is this vaccine suitable for?
 

The 9-valent HPV vaccine is viable for both males and females aged between 9 and 45 years. It is best to be inoculated with this vaccine at an age when the immune system is strongest, and prior to the first instance of sexual intercourse. Those who have already experienced sexual intercourse may also be vaccinated, but it might not be as effective as when administered to people who have not yet experienced sexual intercourse.


 

 

How is the vaccine administered?
 

The 9-valent HPV vaccine is injected into the muscle tissue of the upper arms or thighs. The number of doses you need will depend on your age as shown in the table below:


 
Age No. of doses Schedule
9-14 years*   2** 1st shot: On the first appointment
2nd shot: Between 6-12 months after the first injection
  3 1st shot: On the first appointment
2nd shot: Two months after the first injection
3rd shot: Six months after the first injection
15-45 years 1st shot: On the first appointment
2nd shot: Two months after the first injection
3rd shot: Six months after the first injection

* Final decision on number of doses is at the physician’s discretion.
** If the second shot is given earlier than 5 months after the first shot, a third shot will be needed at least 4 months after the second shot was given.
 

 



The side-effects of this vaccine

Generally, this vaccine does not have any severe side effects. Mild side effects such as pain, swelling, or redness around the point of injection may occur. This might also be accompanied by headaches, fever, nausea, dizziness, fatigue, and stomach pains. These symptoms will only last a short while and will disappear without any need for medical attention.


 

 

Warning

The 9-valent HPV vaccine should not be administered to patients who have a history of allergic reactions to any 9-valent or 4-valent HPV vaccine or any of components of the vaccine, as well as patients with severe yeast allergies.


 

 

Can I receive this vaccine if I have already received all three shots of the 2-valent or 4-valent vaccine?
 


Clinical studies have shown that it is safe to receive the 9-valent HPV vaccine after having completed the 2-valent or 4-valent HPV vaccines schedule. In any case, the physician will make the final consideration as to whether further vaccination is necessary or advisable.

If you require further information, the Drug Information Center at Bumrungrad Hospital is ready to answer any questions 24 hours a day.


 
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For further information please contact the Drug Information Service at Bumrungrad Hospital:

Tel: +66(0) 2 011 3399 Email: [email protected]
 

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