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Test Code:
B12

Order Name:
Vitamin B12*

 
Useful For:
Determination of vitamin B12 in human serum. 
 
Methodology:
Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immuno Assay (CMIA)
 
AliasesName:
B12
Cobalamin
Cobalamin Cyanocobalamin
 
 
 
Test Code:
B12

Order Name:
Vitamin B12*

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
BLood/ Plain Blood (Red Top) 6 mL, 1 tube
 
Specimen Testing Type:
Serum, minimum volume 1 mL
 
Sub Mission Container:
Plastic vial
 
Rejection Criteria:
Hemolysis: Mild or above reject
 
Specimen Stabillity:
Specimen Tpye Temperature Time
Serum (keep in original tube) Room temperature, 20oC to 28oC 8 hours
Serum Refrigerated, 2oC to 8oC 7 days
Frozen, -20oC 14 days
 
 
 
Test Code:
B12

Order Name:
Vitamin B12*

 
Method detail:
Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immuno Assay (CMIA)
 
Schedule:
Tested Daily (24 Hours)
 
Turnaround Time:
Specimen collected to reported within 2:00 Hours (120 Mins)
 
Performing Location:
Immunology, Laboratory Department Tel. 13227
 
Specimen Retention Time:
5 days
 
 
 
Test Code:
B12

Order Name:
Vitamin B12*

 
 
Clinical Information:
Vitamin B12 (B12), a member of the corrin family, is a cofactor for the conversion of methylmalonyl Coenzyme-A (CoA) to succinoyl CoA. In addition, B12 is a cofactor in the synthesis of methionine from
homocysteine, is implicated in the formation of myelin, and, along with folate, is required for DNA synthesis.
B12 is absorbed from food after binding to a protein called intrinsic factor which is produced by the stomach. Causes of vitamin B12 deficiency can be divided into three classes: nutritional deficiency, malabsorption
syndromes, and other gastrointestinal causes. B12 deficiency can cause megaloblastic anemia (MA), nerve damage and degeneration of the spinal cord. Lack of B12, even mild deficiencies, damages the myelin sheath that surrounds and protects nerves, which may lead to peripheral neuropathy.

The nerve damage caused by a lack of B12 may become permanently debilitating, if the underlying condition is not treated. People with intrinsic factor defects who do not get treatment eventually develop a MA called pernicious anemia (PA). The relationship between B12 levels and MA is not always clear in that some
patients with MA will have normal B12 levels; conversely, many individuals with B12 deficiency are not afflicted with MA. Despite these complications, however, in the presence of MA (e.g., elevated mean corpuscular volume (MCV)) there is usually serum B12 or folate deficiency.

There are a number of conditions that are associated with low serum B12 levels, including iron deficiency, normal near-term pregnancy, vegetarianism, partial gastrectomy/ileal damage, celiac disease, use of oral contraception, parasitic competition, pancreatic deficiency, treated epilepsy, and advancing age. Disorders associated with elevated serum B12 levels include renal failure, liver disease, and myeloproliferative diseases.
 
Reference Value:
187 - 883 pg/mL
 
Clinical Reference:
Manufacturer’s Reagent package insert Architect Vitamin B12, November 2015, Abbott Ireland, 
Diagnostics Division Lisnamuck Longford Co., Ireland.