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Clear
 
Test Code:
090-21-1560

Order Name:
Oxalate (U-24 hrs) **

 
Useful For:
Monitoring therapy for kidney stones
Identifying increased urinary oxalate as a risk factor for stone formation
Diagnosis of primary or secondary hyperoxaluria
 

 

 
Methodology:
Enzymatic Using Oxalate Oxidase
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-21-1560

Order Name:
Oxalate (U-24 hrs) **

 
Patient Preparation:

Ingestion of ascorbic acid (>2 g/24 hours) may falsely elevate the measured urinary oxalate excretion, so should be avoided, if possible.

 

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
Urine 24 hours, Clean container 
(Specimen must be refrigerate since collected)
 
 
Specimen Testing Type:
Urine 24 hours, minimum volume 10 mL  + 24-Hour volume is required.
 
Sub Mission Container:
Clean container 
 
Rejection Criteria:
All specimens will be evaluated at Mayo Clinic Laboratories for test suitability.

 
 
Specimen Stabillity:
Specimen Type Temperature Time
Urine Refrigerated (preferred) 14 days
  Frozen  14 days

 
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-21-1560

Order Name:
Oxalate (U-24 hrs) **

 
Method detail:
Enzymatic Using Oxalate Oxidase
 
Schedule:
N/A **Sent out to MAYO, USA
 
Turnaround Time:
Received specimen to reported within 14 days
 
 
Performing Location:
MAYO Laboratory
Referral Lab Services, Laboratory Department 14160-2
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-21-1560

Order Name:
Oxalate (U-24 hrs) **

 
 
Clinical Information:

Oxalate is an end product of glyoxalate and glycerate metabolism. Humans have no enzyme capable of degrading oxalate, so it must be eliminated by the kidney.

In tubular fluid, oxalate can combine with calcium to form calcium oxalate stones. In addition, high concentrations of oxalate may be toxic for renal cells.

Increased urinary oxalate excretion results from inherited enzyme deficiencies (primary hyperoxaluria), gastrointestinal disorders associated with fat malabsorption (secondary hyperoxaluria), or increased oral intake of oxalate-rich foods or vitamin C.

Since increased urinary oxalate excretion promotes calcium oxalate stone formation, various strategies are employed to lower oxalate excretion.

 
Reference Value:

0.11-0.46 mmol/24 hours

9.7-40.5 mg/24 hours

The reference value is for a 24-hour collection. Specimens collected for other than a 24-hour time period are reported in unit of mmol/L for which reference values are not established.

 
Interpretation:

An elevated urine oxalate (>0.46 mmol/24 hours) may suggest disease states such as secondary hyperoxaluria (fat malabsorption), primary hyperoxaluria (alanine glyoxalate transferase enzyme deficiency, glyceric dehydrogenase deficiency), idiopathic hyperoxaluria, or excess dietary oxalate or vitamin C intake.

In stone-forming patients high urinary oxalate values, sometimes even in the upper limit of the normal range, are treated to reduce the risk of stone formation.

 

 

 
Clinical Reference:
www.mayomedicallaboratories.com (Retrieved: 1 July 2020)