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Test Code:
090-10-0040-01

Order Name:
Hemoglobin (Hb)

 
Useful For:
To evaluate the hemoglobin content of your blood as part of a general health checkup; to screen for and help diagnose conditions that affect red blood cells (RBCs); if you have anemia(low hemoglobin) or polycythemia (high hemoglobin), to assess the severity of these conditions and to monitor response to treatment
 
Methodology:
Principle of SLS-Hemoglobin Method
 
AliasesName:
HB
Hemoglobin Concentration
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-10-0040-01

Order Name:
Hemoglobin (Hb)

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
The specimens can be selected as list below:
  1. Blood/ K3 EDTA (K3E) (Lavender Top) 3 mL, 1 tube or
  2. Blood/ Micro EDTA tube 250-500 Ul
 
Specimen Testing Type:
Blood, minimum volume 0.5 mL
 
Sub Mission Container:
Original tube
 
Rejection Criteria:
Clotted specimen will be rejected.
 
Specimen Stabillity:
Specimen Type Temperature Time
Whole blood, EDTA Room temperature, 18oC to 25oC 24 hours
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-10-0040-01

Order Name:
Hemoglobin (Hb)

 
Method detail:
Principle of SLS-Hemoglobin Method
 
Schedule:
Tested Daily (24 hours)
 
Turnaround Time:
Collected specimen to report within 75 mins
 
Performing Location:
Hematology, Laboratory Department Tel. 17254
 
Specimen Retention Time:
5 days
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-10-0040-01

Order Name:
Hemoglobin (Hb)

 
 
Clinical Information:
Hemoglobin is the iron-containing protein found in all red blood cells (RBCs) that gives the cells their characteristic red color. Hemoglobin enables RBCs to bind to oxygen in the lungs and carry it to tissues and organs throughout the body. It also helps transport a small portion of carbon dioxide, a product of cell metabolism, from tissues and organs to the lungs, where it is exhaled.The hemoglobin test measures the amount of hemoglobin in a person's sample of blood. A hemoglobin level can be performed alone or with a hematocrit, a test that measures the proportion of blood that is made up of RBCs, to quickly evaluate an individual's red blood cells. Red blood cells, which make up about 40% (ranging 37-49%) of the blood's volume, are produced in the bone marrow and are released into the bloodstream when they are, or nearly are, mature. The typical lifespan of an RBC is 120 days, and the bone marrow must continually produce new RBCs to replace those that age and degrade or are lost through bleeding. Several diseases and conditions can affect RBCs and consequently the level of hemoglobin in the blood. In general, the hemoglobin level and hematocrit rise when the number of red blood cells increases. The hemoglobin level and hematocrit fall to less than normal when there is a drop in production of RBCs by the bone marrow, an increase in the destruction of RBCs, or if blood is lost due to bleeding. A drop in the RBC count, hemoglobin and hematocrit can result in anemia, a condition in which tissues and organs in the body do not get enough oxygen, causing fatigue and weakness. If too many RBCs are produced, polycythemia results and the blood can become thickened, causing sluggish blood flow and related problems.
 
Reference Value:
Criteria Reference Value Unit
Newborn 14.0 - 20.0 g/dL
Male 14.0 - 18.0 g/dL
Female 12.0 - 16.0 g/dL
 
Clinical Reference:
https://labtestsonline.org (Retrieved: 22 Jan 2019)