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Test Code:
F9

Order Name:
Factor IX activity assay

 
Useful For:
Evaluate spontaneous or prolonged bleeding suggestive of a coagulation disorder, Diagnosing hemophilia B (or Christmas disease)
 
Methodology:
Clotting assay
 
AliasesName:
Factor IX Assay
Hemophilia B
 
 
 
Test Code:
F9

Order Name:
Factor IX activity assay

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
Blood / Sodium citrate tube (Sodium Citrate 3.2% anticoagulant, Blue top) 3 mL, 1 tube
 
Specimen Testing Type:
Citrate plasma, minimum volume 0.5 mL
 
Sub Mission Container:
Plastic tube
 
Rejection Criteria:
Hemolysis: Hemoglobin > 500 mg/dL reject
Lipemia: Triglyceride > 1000 mg/dL reject
Icterus: Bilirubin > 26 mg/dL
Other: Clotted specimen will be rejected.
 
Specimen Stabillity:
Specimen Type Temperature Time
Whole blood, Sodium citrate Room temperature, 18oC to 25oC 4 hours
Plasma, Sodium citrate Refrigerated, 2oC to 8oC 4 hours
Room temperature, 18oC to 25oC 4 hours
Frozen, -20oC 2 weeks
Frozen, -70oC 6 months
 
 
 
Test Code:
F9

Order Name:
Factor IX activity assay

 
Method detail:
Clotting assay
 
Schedule:
Tested Daily (24 hours)
 
Turnaround Time:
Collected specimen to report within 3 hours
 
Performing Location:
Hematology, Laboratory Department Tel. 17254
 
Specimen Retention Time:
14 Days
 
 
 
Test Code:
F9

Order Name:
Factor IX activity assay

 
 
Clinical Information:
Factor IX is a single chain vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein which is synthesized in the liver. During coagulation factor IX is converted to the active form, factor IXa, by either factor XIa or the factor VIIa/tissue factor/phospholipid complex. Factor IXa is the catalytic component of the intrinsic factor Xase complex (factor IXa, factor VIIIa, cellular surface and calcium ions) which proteolytically activates factor X to factor Xa. Congenital deficiency of factor IX leads to Hemophilia B (or Christmas disease), which is a inherited disorder that causes from mild to severe bleeding which may follow injury or occur spontaneously. Factor IX deficiencies may also be acquired secondarily due to other diseases such as liver disease and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC). Patients receiving oral anticoagulant therapy or with a vitamin K deficiency due to intake or absorption abnormalities will have reduced plasma levels of FIX The lack of factor IX in origin causes hemophilia B or Christmas disease as a cause of mild bleeding to severe bleeding. In addition, the reduction of Factor IX may be caused by liver disease or Disseminated Intranascular Coagulation (DIC) as well Genes that control the formation are on the x-chromosome. Heredity is therefore x-linked recessive incidence in men. Approximately 1: 100,000 symptoms and severity are not isolated from hemophilia A and laboratory tests also found that APTT values For a long time, it is necessary to check the factor assay to help diagnose. Because of different treatments
 
Reference Value:
65 -150 % Activity
 
Clinical Reference:
  1. Manufacturer’s reagent package insert , Factor IX deficient plasma, Instrumentation Laboratory Company - Bedford, MA 01730-2443 (USA), Instrumentation Laboratory SpA - V.le Monza 338 - 20128 Milano (Italy); 06/2014
  2. https://www.mayocliniclabs.com (Retrieved: 22 Jan 2019)