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Test Code:
ZN

Order Name:
Zinc (Blood)

 
Useful For:
  • Detection of acute or very recent Zinc exposure
  • Monitoring the effectiveness of therapy
 
Methodology:
Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)
 
AliasesName:
Zn (Zinc), Blood
 
 
 
Test Code:
ZN

Order Name:
Zinc (Blood)

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
Blood/ K2EDTA Blood (Royal blue-top) 6 mL, 1 tube  
 
Specimen Testing Type:
K2EDTA Whole blood, minimun 5 mL 
 
Sub Mission Container:
Plastic vial (PP Grade)
 
Rejection Criteria:
Hemolysis: 1+ reject
 
Specimen Stabillity:
Specimen Type Temperature Time
K2EDTA blood (keep in original tube) Refrigerated, 2oC to 8oC 14 days
 
 
 
Test Code:
ZN

Order Name:
Zinc (Blood)

 
Method detail:
Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)
 
Schedule:
Tested on Tuesday and Friday at 7.00 a.m.
 
Turnaround Time:
Result reporting within Wednesday or Saturday, before 3.00 p.m.
 
Performing Location:
Chemistry, Laboratory Department Tel. 13224
 
Specimen Retention Time:
1 month
 
 
 
Test Code:
ZN

Order Name:
Zinc (Blood)

 
 
Clinical Information:
The most common and most stable oxidation number of zinc is +2 [Zn(II)]. Zinc is a ubiquitous trace element found in plants and animals. The adult human body contains approximately 1.5–2.5 g of zinc, present in all organs, tissues, fluids and secretions. The level of free intracellular Zn(II) is as low as 0.5 nM, as estimated from measurements of the zinc-specific 19F-NMR signal of a fluorinatedmetal chelating probe (Benters et al., 1997).     

Zinc is an element present in more than 70 different enzymes that function in many aspects of cellular metabolism, involving metabolism of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates.
 
Reference Value:
70 – 120 µg/dL
 
Interpretation:
Zinc deficiency may cause growth retardation and hypogonadism in humans (Prasad et al., 1961). Other symptoms of zinc deficiency include loss of appetite, dermatitis, reduced taste acuity, delayed wound healing, impaired reproduction and poor immune function. Zinc helps manage insulin action and blood glucose concentration and has an essential role in the development and maintenance of the body’s immune system.           

Severe zinc deficiency is rare and usually caused by genetic or acquired conditions. Zinc has an antioxidant effect and this may have benefited a few cases of hepatitis. Zinc intake seems also promising to inhibit herpes simplex virus (Kumel et al., 1990) and rhinoviruses (Korant et al., 1974). 
 
Clinical Reference:
  1. แสงโฉม เกิดคล้าย, บรรณาธิการ. แนวทางการวินิจฉัยเพื่อการรายงานโรคจากการประกอบอาชีพและ สิ่งแวดล้อม. พิมพ์ครั้งที่1. สำนักระบาดวิทยา กรมควบคุมโรค กระทรวงสาธารณสุข. สิงหาคม 2547:หน้า 22-33
  2. NCCLS document C38-A, Control of Pre analytical Variation in trace Element Determinations; Approved Guideline, 1997
  3. Biomarker Testing of Industrial Chemicals; Version 2018
  4. www.Thaitox.com
  5. The handbook of Environmental Chemistry Volume 3 Part A, Handbook on the toxicology of metals. Volume I., Ärztlicher Befundbericht, IMD Institut für Medizinische Diagnostik Berlin-Potsdam GbR, Nicolaistraße 22 - 12247 Berlin (Steglitz).
  6. http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com (Retrieved: 01 Jan 2019)
  7. K. Jomova, M. Valko, Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease, Toxicology 283 (2011) 65–87