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Test Code:
URIC

Order Name:
Uric Acid

 
Useful For:
Uric acid is a metabolite of purines, nucleic acids, and nucleoproteins. Consequently, abnormal levels may be indicative of a disorder in the metabolism of these substances. Hyperuricemia may be observed in renal dysfunction, gout, leukemia, polycythemia, atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypothyroidism, or in some genetic diseases. Decreased levels are present in patients with Wilson’s disease.
 
Methodology:
Uricase
 
 
 
Test Code:
URIC

Order Name:
Uric Acid

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
Blood/ Plain blood (Red top) 6 mL, 1 tube
 
Specimen Testing Type:
Serum, minimum volume 0.5 mL
 
Sub Mission Container:
Plastic vial
 
Rejection Criteria:
Hemolysis: 4+ reject 
 
Specimen Stabillity:
Specimen Type Temperature Time
Serum Refrigerated, 2oC to 8oC 7 days
Frozen, -20oC 6 months
 
 
 
Test Code:
URIC

Order Name:
Uric Acid

 
Method detail:
Uricase
 
Schedule:
Tested daily (24 hours)
 
Turnaround Time:
Collected specimen to report within 1.5 hours (90 mins)
 
Performing Location:
Chemistry, Laboratory Department Tel. 13224
 
Specimen Retention Time:
5 days
 
 
 
Test Code:
URIC

Order Name:
Uric Acid

 
 
Clinical Information:
Uric acid is the final product of purine metabolism in humans. Purines, compounds that are vital components of nucleic acids and coenzymes, may be synthesized in the body or they may be obtained by ingesting foods rich in nucleic material (eg, liver, sweetbreads). Approximately 75% of the uric acid excreted is lost in the urine; most of the remainder is secreted into the gastrointestinal tract where it is degraded to allantoin and other compounds by bacterial enzymes.
Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is frequently detected through biochemical screening. The major causes of hyperuricemia are increased purine synthesis, inherited metabolic disorder, excess dietary purine intake, increased nucleic acid turnover, malignancy, cytotoxic drugs, and decreased excretion due to chronic renal failure or increased renal reabsorption. Long-term follow-up of these patients is undertaken because many are at risk of developing renal disease; few of these patients ever develop the clinical syndrome of gout.
 
Reference Value:
Male: 3.5 – 8.5 mg/dL
Female: 2.5– 7.5 mg/dL
 
Interpretation:
Hyperuricemia is most commonly defined by serum or plasma uric acid concentrations above 8.5 mg/dL in males or above 7.5 mg/dL in females.
 
Clinical Reference:
  1. Manufacturer’s reagent package insert, Architect® Uric, Abbott Laboratories, Diagnostic Division, Abbott Park IL 60064 USA, July 2015.
  2. http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com (Retrieved: 01 Jan 2019)