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Test Code:
RUBM

Order Name:
Rubella IgM

 
Useful For:
  • Detection of IgM antibodies to Rubella virus in human serum.
  • Useful aid in diagnosis of Rubella virus acute infection.
 
Methodology:
Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immuno Assay (CMIA)
 
AliasesName:
German Measles IgM antibody
RUB IgM
 
 
 
Test Code:
RUBM

Order Name:
Rubella IgM

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
Blood/ Plain Blood (Red Top) 6 mL, 1 tube
 
Specimen Testing Type:
Serum, minimum volume 1 mL
 
Sub Mission Container:
Plastic vial
 
Rejection Criteria:
Hemolysis: 4+ reject
 
Specimen Stabillity:
Specimen Type Temperature Time
Serum (keep in original tube) Room temperature, 20oC to 28oC 8 hours
Serum Refrigerated, 2oC to 8oC 14 days
Frozen, -10oC 30 days
 
 
 
Test Code:
RUBM

Order Name:
Rubella IgM

 
Method detail:
Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immuno Assay (CMIA)
 
Schedule:
Tested Daily (24 Hours)
 
Turnaround Time:
Specimen collected to reported within 3:00 Hours (180 Mins)
 
Performing Location:
Immunology, Laboratory Department Tel. 13227
 
Specimen Retention Time:
5 days
 
 
 
Test Code:
RUBM

Order Name:
Rubella IgM

 
 
Clinical Information:
Primary postnatal Rubella infection is typically a mild self-limiting disease characterized by a macropapular rash, fever, malaise and lymphadenopathy.  In contrast to postnatal infections, primary prenatal infections may have devastating effects. In utero infections may severely damage the fetus, particularly if occurring during the first four months of gestation. The congenitally infected infant may exhibit one or more of a variety of defects collectively known as the Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS). Among these are low birth weight, cataracts, deafness, congenital heart disease and mental retardation.

Since Rubella does not have typical symptomatology, the clinical picture can be quite variable. The disease is often difficult or impossible to diagnose from symptoms alone.  The ability to detect the IgM class of anti-Rubella antibody in a single sample overcomes some of the problems associated with paired sera analysis of specific IgG and provides a clearer serodiagnosis picture.

A primary infection is associated with the pronounced IgM antibody response to the Rubella virus. In cases of acute primary infection during pregnancy, IgM has been detected 4 to 15 days after appearance of the rash in nearly 100% of the cases. IgM levels begin to decline after 36 to 70 days, and are infrequently detected after 180 days.  IgM antibody reactive with Rubella virus has been observed following reinfection, however, the levels are low and not detectable by all IgM assays. Such asymptomatic reinfection of immune pregnant women, generally believed to be harmless to the fetus, is characterized serologically usually only by a significant rise in IgG antibody titer.

Although the clinical utility of Rubella IgM detection is usually associated with testing pregnant women, testing of nonpregnant individuals for IgM antibodies to Rubella virus is a useful aid in diagnosis of acute infection.  In situations where primary infection is suspected, the optimum time for specimen collection has been reported to be 1 to 2 weeks after the onset of the rash. Reactivity for IgM antibodies to Rubella may indicate current infection, reactivation or recent vaccination.
 
Reference Value:
Non reactive 
 
Clinical Reference:
Manufacturer’s Reagent package insert  Architect Rubella IgM, May 2017, Abbott Ireland Diagnostics Division, Finisklin Business Park, Sligo, Ireland.