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Clear
 
Test Code:
MIBTS0030

Order Name:
Gram Stain (Urine)

 
Useful For:
Identifying microorganisms in clinical specimen Identifying microorganisms in urine Guiding initial antimicrobial therapy
 
Methodology:
Conventional Gram Stain Procedure
 
AliasesName:
Urine Gram Stain
 
 
 
Test Code:
MIBTS0030

Order Name:
Gram Stain (Urine)

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
Urine/ Sterile container
 
Specimen Testing Type:
Urine, Volume minimum 1 mL.
 
Sub Mission Container:
Sterile container
 
Rejection Criteria:
Swab in Stuart transport medium will be reject.
 
Specimen Stabillity:
Specimen Type Temperature Time
Random urine Room temperature, 18oC to 25oC 2 hours
Refrigerated, 2oC to 8oC 24 hours
 
 
 
Test Code:
MIBTS0030

Order Name:
Gram Stain (Urine)

 
Method detail:
Conventional Gram Stain Procedure
 
Schedule:
Tested daily (24 hours)
 
Turnaround Time:
Received specimen to report within 2 hours.
 
Performing Location:
Microbiology, Laboratory Department Tel. 14171
 
Specimen Retention Time:
Specimen Type Time
Specimen 7 days
Gram stain slide 1 month
 
 
 
Test Code:
MIBTS0030

Order Name:
Gram Stain (Urine)

 
 
Clinical Information:
The Gram stain is a general stain used extensively in microbiology for the preliminary differentiation of microbiological organisms. The Gram stain is one of the simplest, least expensive, and most useful of the rapid methods used to identify and classify bacteria. The Gram stain is used to provide preliminary information concerning the type of organisms present directly from clinical specimens or from growth on culture plates. This stain is used to identify the presence of microorganisms in normally sterile body fluids (cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, peritoneal fluid). It is also used to screen sputum specimens to establish acceptability for bacterial culture (<25 squamous epithelial cells per field is considered an acceptable specimen for culture) and may reveal the causative organism in bacterial pneumonia.
 
Reference Value:
No microorganisms seen
 
Interpretation:
Positive Gram stain results usually include a description of what was seen on the slide. This typically includes: Whether the bacteria are Gram-positive (purple) or Gram-negative (red) Shape — round (cocci) or rods (bacilli) Size, relative quantity, and/or arrangement of the bacteria Whether there are bacteria present within other cells (intracellular) Presence white blood cells Fungi (in the form of yeasts or molds) may be seen on a Gram stain and are reported.
 
Clinical Reference:
  1. Amy L. Leber, editor. Clinical Microbiology Procedure Handbook 4th Edition. Washington DC: American Society for Microbiology; 2016
  2. James H. Jorgensen, Michael A. PFALLER. Manual of Clinical Microbiology 11th ed. Washington, DC: ASM Press; 2015
  3. https://www.mayocliniclabs.com (Retrieved: 29 Jan 2019)