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Test Code:
090-31-0271-01

Order Name:
Chlamydia pneumoniae IgG (blood) **

 
Useful For:
Aids in the clinical diagnosis of chlamydial infections.
 
Methodology:
MIF (Microimmunofluorescense)
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-31-0271-01

Order Name:
Chlamydia pneumoniae IgG (blood) **

 
Collection Specimen Or Container:
Blood/ Plain Blood (Red Top) 5 mL, 1 tube

 
 
Specimen Testing Type:
Serum, minimum volume 2-3 mL 
 
Sub Mission Container:
Plastic tube
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-31-0271-01

Order Name:
Chlamydia pneumoniae IgG (blood) **

 
Method detail:
MIF (Microimmunofluorescense)
 
Schedule:
N/A **Sent Out to Chulalongkorn
 
Turnaround Time:
Received specimen to reported within 7 days
 
 
Performing Location:
Chulalongkorn
Referral Lab Services, Laboratory Department 14160-2
 
 
 
Test Code:
090-31-0271-01

Order Name:
Chlamydia pneumoniae IgG (blood) **

 
 
Clinical Information:

Members of the family Chlamydiaceae are small, nonmotile, gram-negative, obligate intracellular organisms that grow in the cytoplasm of host cells. Two genera of clinical importance are Chlamydia, which includes Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila, which includes Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Chlamydophila psittaci. These organisms share many features of bacteria and are susceptible to antibiotic therapy. They are also similar to viruses, requiring living cells for multiplication.
The chlamydial life cycle can be divided into 2 distinct phases: an extracellular, nonreplicating, infectious and obligate intracellular, replicating, noninfectious stage. The infectious form, or elementary body (EB), attaches to the target cell membrane and enters the cell via a phagosome. After cell entry, the EB reorganizes into reticulate particles (forming inclusion bodies) and binary fission begins. After 18 to 24 hours, reticulate particles condense to form EBs. These new EBs are released, beginning another infection cycle.
Chlamydophila psittaci is the causative agent of psittacosis, a disease characterized by pneumonia, headache, altered mentation, and hepatosplenomegaly. Psittacosis is acquired by airborne transmission from infected birds.
Chlamydophila pneumoniae (formerly known as TWAR and, more recently, as Chlamydia pneumoniae) causes pneumonia in humans. It is unique because it is a primary pathogen of humans, is spread from human to human, and apparently has no animal or bird host. Chlamydophila pneumoniae is responsible for approximately 10% of pneumonia cases.
Chlamydia trachomatis has been implicated in a wide variety of infections in humans. It is a common cause of nongonococcal urethritis and cervicitis, and many systemic complications of chlamydial infections have been described. In females, this organism is a cause of pelvic inflammatory disease, salpingitis, and endometritis. In males, epididymitis and Reiter syndrome occur. Lymphogranuloma venereum is a sexually transmitted infection caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. It presents with a transient primary genital lesion followed by suppurative regional lymphadenopathy. Occasionally, severe proctitis or proctocolitis may develop. Chlamydia trachomatis also causes ophthalmologic infections, such as trachoma (rare in the United States), adult inclusion conjunctivitis and inclusion conjunctivitis in neonates. These disorders have traditionally been diagnosed by cytologic detection or culture. However, molecular detection methods (CTRNA / Chlamydia trachomatis by Nucleic Acid Amplification [GEN-PROBE]) may now represent a more sensitive diagnostic approach.
Fitz-Hugh-Curtis syndrome (perihepatitis) has been associated with chlamydiae.

 
Reference Value:
< 1:512